Ubuntu 16.10 Release Reached End of Support

Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak reached end of life in July 2017. It means you won’t get security and maintenance updates anymore. If you are still using it, you should upgrade your Ubuntu system immediately.

The rest of the article is old and talks about Ubuntu 16.10 release schedule and other stuff.

Ubuntu 16.10 release schedule is outYes, it was only a few days ago when we were learning the tips on things to do in the newly released Ubuntu 16.04. And today we have Ubuntu 16.10 release dates announced.

This is what I appreciate about Ubuntu. They always have a clear roadmap and they stick to it. Perhaps this is the reason that in the history of 11 years of development, only one Ubuntu release (Ubuntu 6.06) has been delayed ever.

Ubuntu 16.10 is a regular release that will be coming in the third week of October later this year. Important dates of the release schedule are listed below:

Ubuntu 16.10 Release Date

  • Alpha 1 – 30 June
  • Alpha 2 – 28 July
  • Feature Freeze – 18 August
  • Beta 1 – 25 August
  • UI Freeze – 8 September
  • Final Beta – 22 September
  • Kernel Freeze – 6 October
  • Release Candidate – 13 October
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Final release – 20 October

This release schedule of Ubuntu 16.10 is valid for all the official Ubuntu flavors i.e. Ubuntu Unity, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Mate, Xubuntu, Kubuntu, Lubuntu.

Ubuntu 16.10 Release Date

An important release

Ubuntu 16.10, codenamed Yakkety Yak, will be supported for 9 months i.e. until July’17. This release is important from the perspective that it will be testing ground for some of the new technologies Canonical is trying to bring.

Most likely, Ubuntu 16.10 will feature Unity 8, Mir server and more aggressively pushed Snap packages. Unity 8 and Mir has been given the slip in Ubuntu 16.04 because it was a long term support release.

I’ll cover more details about Ubuntu 16.10 as the development happens. Meanwhile, you can mark your calendar with Ubuntu 16.10 release dates, you can read this interesting article on Linux distributions’ code-naming convention and versioning number.

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